A person sits near an open fire with her feet up on a coffee table covered in a red and black rug. On the table are a steaming hot cup of coffee, a mobile phone, a blank notepad and a remote control.

What are you listening to?

How to start playing piano as an adult

Put your feet up and relax. Are you listening to some music and thinking how wonderful it would be to play an instrument? Or perhaps you’re feeling some regret that you never learnt or that you didn’t continue learning?

What happens for you when you listen to music? What kinds of music do you like? People often say that different kinds of music affect their mood and emotions, giving them energy or relaxation, and a different perception on things.

What is it about playing the piano that appeals to you? Perhaps there’s a family piano or keyboard not being used that would provide easy access to an instrument. Perhaps you like the symmetrical feeling of doing something with both hands while you’re sitting down? Or you may have an image of yourself playing the music you want to play.

Whatever the motivator, it needs to be the right time for you to start. So, why now? How does it fit into your life? What time do you have to learn this new skill or to get re-skilled?

Think of other things you’ve learnt to do as an adult. What was helpful? What wasn’t? These principles can guide you in learning to play the piano as an adult.

It is also important to consider whether you or anyone close to you has any objections to you playing the piano. It’s a good idea to be aware of these so they don’t get in the way later.

Is one of your obstacles that you think it will be too hard? Or if you’ve played before, that it’s too long ago and you may not remember anything? The old muscle memory will still be there. It is important to choose the right pieces for you to play straight away, with a bit of a challenge for later. You’ll enjoy learning in a faster, more streamlined way.

Is one of your objections about not being able to read music? Any experience you’ve had will be helpful, even if it’s a long time ago. Perhaps you played the recorder as a kid or sang in the school choir? Some basic principles will still be there for you to build on. You’ll enjoy learning how music works as you play the pieces you want to play.

What pieces of music would be on your play list? Why those? They don’t need to be pieces of music specifically written for the piano. The piano is a great instrument to play all kinds of music. Do you want to be able to sing and play at the same time, or just play?

Your thoughts on these issues will provide helpful guidelines for structuring a learning experience that specifically suits your learning style.

My job is to make learning the piano fun and easy so that you can play the music you want to play.

I look forward to working together to add some more music to your life.

Please contact me to find out more about learning the piano as an adult.


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